Archive for the 'recipes' Category

Clean Eating Endive Salad from Tiffany at The Gracious Pantry

"This salad is a fabulous reminder of how light and flavorful autumn and winter produce can be."

“This salad is a fabulous reminder of how light and flavorful autumn and winter produce can be.”

Even if Indian Summer lingers on, it’s nice to see apples crowding the markets again. Here’s a wonderful recipe to take advantage of fall and winter vegetables from Tiffany at The Gracious Pantry. As she describes it: an “explosion of flavor.” What more could you ask from a salad?

Click here for the full recipe.

Tiffany McCauley is a published cookbook author, recipe developer and food blogger. She publishes TheGraciousPantry.com, a blog for clean eating recipes as well as the soon-to-lauch recipe blog, UncomplicatedCooking.com.

Braised Endive from Adam of Amateur Gourmet

Braised Endive from Adam of Amateur Gourmet

Braised Endive from Adam of Amateur Gourmet

A cube of braised endive served on a cheese plate at The French Laundry inspired Adam Roberts to recreate what he had tasted at home. Better yet, he decided to prepare it for breakfast, served aside what he calls a “typical breakfast of scrambled eggs and toast.”

“The suprise is that (braised endive) is really easy to make at home,” Adam writes. With the help of a little butter, olive oil and heat (oh, and more butter), Adam transformed a few heads of endive into his morning side dish.

Did the braised endive play nice with the eggs and toast? Click here to find out and see if you dare to try endive for breakfast!

Adam Roberts started his blog Amateur Gourmet as a way to chronicle his journey into the culinary world and out of a career in law. Along the way he has published a cookbook, hosted “The FN Dish” on the Food Network website and written for some of the best known food sites and publications around. 

Sugar Snap Pea and Endive Salad from Cheri at Skinny Chick

Sugar Snap Pea and Endive Salad from Cheri at Skinny Chick

Sugar Snap Pea and Endive Salad from Cheri at Skinny Chick

Summer is officially here, bringing long hazy days spent trying to beat the heat. What could be more in order than a fuss-free meal that involves no cooking? Cheri from Skinny Chick has just the recipe. She offers this delightful salad featuring sugar snap peas, endive and a light vinaigrette. Oh, and don’t forget a gentle dusting of Parmesan cheese! Read the full recipe here.

About the blogger

Cheri Liefeld is a recipe developer, food writer and cooking instructor. She offers easy, healthy recipes for family meals, entertaining ideas and ideas for cooking with kids on her blogs Skinny Chick and Adventures in the Kitchen.

Neufchâtel and Smoked Salmon Boats from Jaymee of E is for Eat

Neufchâtel and Smoked Salmon Boats from Jaymee of E is for Eat

Neufchâtel and Smoked Salmon Boats from Jaymee of E is for Eat (click for recipe)

Sometimes, especially in the heat and humidity of summer, cooking is just not an option. Try these delicious Neufchâtel and Smoked Salmon Endive Boats from Jaymee of E is for Eat. Of course, they make a stunning appetizer for your next cocktail party, but why wait for a special occasion? By combining some flavorful ingredients–that conveniently require no cooking–you have a scrumptious light meal whenever the mood strikes!

Many thanks to Jaymee for sharing her delicious endive recipes with us. If you missed any of them, check out her Escarole, Endive,  Radicchio and Asparagus Salad and Tuna Salad in Endive Boats, too. If you live the Bay area, be sure to catch Jaymee on ComcastSportsNet Bay Area!)

Jaymee Sire is an Emmy-award winning sports reporter, anchor and host at Comcast SportsNet Bay Area in San Francisco. When she isn’t covering a sporting event, her true passion is food…whether it’s eating out or cooking at home. She writes a blog called E is for Eat, posting alphabet-themed recipes and restaurant reviews several times per week. Be sure to follow Jaymee on Twitter and E is for Eat on Facebook.

Escarole, Endive, Radicchio & Shaved Asparagus Salad from Jaymee of E is for Eat

Escarole, Endive, Radicchio & Shaved Asparagus Salad from Jaymee of E is for Eat

Escarole, Endive, Radicchio & Shaved Asparagus Salad from Jaymee of E is for Eat

Once again, we are thrilled to feature a recipe from Jaymee of E is for Eat. She shared this recipe in May to celebrate National Salad Month. We think salads made with California endive should be on your menu any time of year, especially as we move into those hot summer months. Plus, this recipe includes asparagus, which is in season now!

Stay tuned, because we’ll have more links to Jaymee’s  fabulous endive recipes coming up! (And if you live the Bay area, be sure to catch Jaymee on ComcastSportsNet Bay Area!)

Jaymee Sire is an Emmy-award winning sports reporter, anchor and host at Comcast SportsNet Bay Area in San Francisco. When she isn’t covering a sporting event, her true passion is food…whether it’s eating out or cooking at home. She writes a blog called E is for Eat, posting alphabet-themed recipes and restaurant reviews several times per week. Be sure to follow Jaymee on Twitter and E is for Eat on Facebook.

Win Some Freshly Packed California Endive!

Caramelized Endive with Brown Butter Sage Sauce from Carolyn of All Day I Dream About Food

Caramelized Endive with Brown Butter Sage Sauce from Carolyn of All Day I Dream About Food

Ready for another chance to win a shipment of freshly packed California endive? Head over to All Day I Dream About Food, a food blog written by Carolyn, one of our OnDivas. She’s hosting a giveaway that includes California endive, a copy of the fabulous and beautiful cookbook Ripe, and a Discover Endive dip tray. And just to get your taste buds fired up, she’s provided a lovely round-up of endive recipes for you to try.

Hurry over, as the sweepstakes ends on June 4th!

E is for Eat, and Some New Endive Recipes from Jaymee Sire

We recently discovered a new (to us) food blogger creating some amazing dishes with California endive. Even more fun, now we get to share her blog, E is for Eat, and endive recipes with you!

Tuna Salad in Endive Boats, from Jaymee of "E is for Eat"

Tuna Salad in Endive Boats, from Jaymee of “E is for Eat”

First up: beat the heat this Memorial Day (and all summer long) by whipping up Tuna Salad in Endive Boats. No cooking, barely any clean-up…what could be easier? And that’s not all. Read more of Jaymee’s ideas for filling endive boats here. Then stay tuned, because we’ll have more links to her fabulous endive recipes coming up!

Jaymee Sire is an Emmy-award winning sports reporter, anchor and host at Comcast SportsNet Bay Area in San Francisco. When she isn’t covering a sporting event, her true passion is food…whether it’s eating out or cooking at home. She writes a blog called E is for Eat, posting alphabet-themed recipes and restaurant reviews several times per week. Be sure to follow Jaymee on Twitter and E is for Eat on Facebook.

How to Grill Endive, from Paula of Bell’alimento

How to Grill Endive

How to Grill Endive

Just in time for grilling season, OnDiva Paula from bell’alimento gives us her tips on mastering the grill. Find out her favorite veggies for grilling, and while you’re there, check out the rest of her endive recipes!

What are some of your favorite foods to grill during the summer?

Kid-Friendly Ham and Cheese Endive Nachos from Rachael of La Fuji Mama

Ham and Cheese Endive Nachos

Ham and Cheese Endive Nachos

Looking for a way to entice your kids to eat more endive? With all the nutrients that endive packs into those pale yellow or red leaves, you should be!

One of our OnDivas, Rachael of La Fuji Mama, helps out with this great recipe for Ham and Cheese Endive Nachos. All the crispy, crunchy, salty, cheesy goodness, with less fat and calories than traditional nachos. Find out which took less time: making the nachos, or watching them disappear!

Read more…

 

Korean Barbeque-Stuffed Endive Leaves from Amy of Word Kitchen

Today we are honored to have a guest post from Amy of Word Kitchen, who writes about the culinary connections between American Thanksgiving traditions and her son’s South Korean heritage. Her Korean Barbeque-Stuffed Endive Leaves are a savory treat from her home to yours, ready to be enjoyed any time!

Writer Amy Rogers Nazarov (in black, at end of table) enjoys Thanksgiving dinner with her family at home in Washington, DC in November 2011. The Korean Barbeque-Stuffed Endive Leaves were long gone by this point. (photo courtesy Ari Nazarov)

My husband Ari and I brought our son home from South Korea when he was almost nine months old.

Adopting Jake has made our lives richer in so many ways, from the friends with whom we socialize – families built by adoption and biology – to the dreams we nurture about a journey back to South Korea so Jake can see where he was born – and, with luck, see his foster family and his birth relatives.
Jake is almost five years old, and talking openly about his adoption is just the way we do things around here. He knows he did not come out of my belly but out of his birth mom’s. There is a photo of his foster mother holding him on our living-room mantel. And I’ve told him he used to ride in his foster mom’s podaegi when she went out to buy food or run errands in the bustling city of Seoul. A podaegi is a Korean baby carrier, a great length of fabric the caregiver wraps around herself and the baby so the infant is cozily snuggled against her back. The moment I first laid eyes on my son, in the parking lot of his foster family’s apartment building, all I could see was his head sticking out of the podaegi.
Happily, Jake likes Korean food, which we eat in restaurants about once a month and which I am learning to make at home. Last Thanksgiving, I experimented with Korean barbeque, which is usually made with short ribs marinated in a salty-sweet sauce. I thought it might be the basis of an appetizer giving a nod to Jake’s birth culture, which we seek to honor and learn more about any chance we get.
My entire family – my parents, my brother and sister and their spouses and children – came from New England to Washington to celebrate and eat with Ari, Jake and me. By and large, it was a traditional American feast: there was a 20-pound turkey, my brother Paul’s green-bean casserole, my sister Alison’s squash, my mother Carol’s apple pie (true confession: we’d all take apple over pumpkin any darn day). But like I said, I wanted to put a Korean stamp on the meal.
This dish is based on the Korean barbeque recipe in Joohee Muromcew’s The Baby Bistro Cookbook (Rodale, 2003). I used 80/20 ground beef, marinating it for an hour or so before I dropped it down in the hot skillet. The first time I prepared the dish, I made two mistakes: one, I used ground sirloin, which dried out because of the relative lack of fat. Also, I worked the marinade into the meat, which made the cooked beef tough. I advise you to purchase ground chuck for the recipe and then to just let the meat hang out in the marinade, turning it a couple of times; you’ll have a chance to work the flavors in later when you are browning it.
When it’s cooled a little, I spooned the cooked beef into endive leaves, which not only add crunch, color and contrast but are sturdy enough to hold the meat. My husband is a vegetarian, but everyone else gobbled up the meat-stuffed leaves with gusto.
My hope is to serve a Korean dish at every Thanksgiving. We’re a Korean-American family now, and preparing and eating the food of our son’s birth country can, I think, help tide us over until we get back to Korea one day to help him better understand where he came from on his journey to us.
Korean Barbeque-Stuffed Endive Leaves
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 scallions or chives, chopped
½ cup low-sodium soy sauce
1 T hoisin sauce (optional)
1 T white sugar
1 T brown sugar
2 T toasted sesame oil
1 pound ground beef (preferably ground chuck, which has a higher fat content)
Two heads of endive, washed, with leaves pulled off and ready to fill
Mix the scallions, garlic, soy sauce, hoisin sauce (if you are using it), sugars and oil in large self-closing plastic bag (it has to be big because the meat’s going into it). Make sure you dissolve the sugars. Place the beef in the bag and let it marinate for a minimum of 15 minutes. You can also leave it there overnight.
Into a skillet preheated to medium, dump the entire contents of the bag. Break apart the marinated beef with a spoon for 10 minutes or more. Resist the urge to turn up the heat; the sugar in the marinade can burn if it’s too hot.
Once the meat is no longer pink inside (be sure to take out a knife and check!), pile a tablespoon or so of the beef into the waiting endive leaves (enlist some help from anyone standing around in the kitchen, as this is a bit time-consuming). The bigger leaves might be able to hold a bit more.
The meat-stuffed leaves look nice arranged on a round platter. These tasty bites cool off quickly, but they taste good warm or at room temperature.
About the blogger:
Amy Rogers Nazarov (photo courtesy Ari Nazarov)

Amy Rogers Nazarov (photo courtesy Ari Nazarov)

Amy Rogers Nazarov writes about food, adoption and technology from her home in Washington, DC. Her byline has appeared in Cooking Light, Washingtonian, The Washington Post, The Writer, Cure, BizTech, The Baltimore Examiner, Media Bistro, and many other outlets. Amy blogs at www.wordkitchen.net, tweets @WordKitchenDC, and is represented by Fairbank Literary Representation (http://www.fairbankliterary.com/)

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